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Becoming King
Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Making of a National Leader:
Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century

by Troy Jackson
Narrated by Andrew L Barnes

Ear phones award winnerEARPHONES AWARD

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This book is destined to become an instant classic. Troy Jackson’s thorough and gripping biography demonstrates Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, growth as a person and a leader. Andrew L. Barnes’s performance enhances the experience. Capturing an orator like King on audio is a daunting task, and the listener will appreciate Barnes’s agility as he handles each aspect of the book with apparent ease.

Whether he’s describing an event or a meeting or delivering one of King’s speeches, Barnes excels at keeping the story moving and the listener engaged. The book itself is a superb and highly detailed account of the Civil Rights leader that reveals much more about King than many of us knew before. D.J.S. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award © AudioFile 2013, Portland, Maine [Published: MAY 2013]

Television Highlights

Here's a new production for The Bible Tells Me So. com God is mighty in power, love and mercy! Think about this wondrous world He created for you & me.

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E-Learning 

This week's auditions ranged from the typical to bizarre. Listen to how much fun I had doing this series!

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Bunion Derby
The 1928 Footrace Across America

On March 4, 1928, 199 men lined up in Los Angeles, California, to participate in a 3,400-mile transcontinental footrace to New York City.

 

The Bunion Derby, as the press dubbed the event, was the brainchild of sports promoter Charles C. Pyle. He promised a $25,000 grand prize and claimed the competition would immortalize US Route 66, a 2,400-mile road, mostly unpaved, that subjected the runners to mountains, deserts, mud, and sandstorms, from Los Angeles to Chicago. 

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Mississippi in Africa:
The Saga of the Slaves of Prospect Hill Plantation and Their Legacy in Liberia Today

 

The gripping story of 200 freed Mississippi slaves who sailed to Liberia to build a new colony - where the colonists' repression of the native tribes would beget a tragic cycle of violence. When a wealthy Mississippi cotton planter named Isaac Ross died in 1836, his will decreed that his plantation, Prospect Hill, should be liquidated and the proceeds from the sale be used to pay for his slaves' passage to the newly established colony of Liberia in western Africa.

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